Dec 14, 2017

We are family – life with my housemates

Are you wondering what it is like to live with other students when you are studying abroad? Well, I can tell you what to expect! How does it feel to share a house with new people? And will you eventually become a family with your housemates?

Before I started my studies, the thought of life with other students was in the back of my head. It was something similar to a dream of new beginning where you are not entirely sure what to expect, but you know it will happen anyway. It turned out to be so much more different than I expected!

Last year, when I moved from Sofia (Bulgeria) to Vlissingen, my life started all over again. Honestly, this is the year that has passed the fastest of all the years in my entire life. The main reason for this, is the life with my roommates, I think. We are so much more than just housemates where you have to deal with because you don’t have another choice. My roommates are always there for me. If I have any kind of problem, I can always turn to them and ask for advice.

life with my housemates - we are family 2.jpg

Me and my housemates having fun on top of the dunes in Vlissingen. 

Living with other students has it’s pros. For example, eating can be a lot cheaper if you cook for multiple people and split the costs. Besides, it is more fun going for groceries with your best friends.

Furthermore, I live with ten other people, so there is almost always someone at home. And personally I find the thought, that I am not going to spend my entire day or evening alone, as very comforting. Visiting new cities and neighbor countries brings the whole house together. It is so much more exciting when you spend this time with the people who are such a big part of your life. Going to the gym is tiring, but if you go with your roommates, then even complaining about it makes it more bearable. And because of all the movie nights we’ve had, I know so many new good shows that I had not heard of before.

Fortunately, I can’t really complain about my life with other students, but despite all the good things, there are a few things that might not be pleasant. At the beginning, everyone is used to live with their parents and suddenly you have to move out and try to have a life with people you have never met before.

The house probably won’t be as tidy as you parents’ one and if you are a clean person, I advise you to set some rules in the very beginning so that everyone helps for keeping the place nice.

Another problem that will most likely arise, is someone you became close with moves out. In my case, this happened a couple of times. It is always hard saying goodbye to the people you love, but it’s even harder if you think of these people as part of your family. Thankfully, almost everyone who moved out of the house, comes back for the weekends to meet with all of us who are still living here, and have a nice dinner with some of the people you love the most.

To conclude, as a person who has spent the past year living with other students, I would advise you to think through both possibilities of living by yourself and with other people. Choose what you think what would make you happy. After all, the purpose of university life is to give you a better sight over things and studies, but also to make you feel like you belong right where you are, and there is a very big possibility that you might experience what I have, and that is not only to find a new place to live in, but finding a new home and a new family that supports you, cares for you, and most importantly, loves you.

Thinking of studying abroad? Download this whitepaper and discover what it is like to study in the NederlandsThe Dutch Education System explained: studying abroad in the Netherlands.

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